Have A Care Kit Party Each One Reach One

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Maybe, just maybe, we will have a chance to “unplug” in the days ahead!

In case you missed it, my last post, Music Moves Us, made me think about another song which goes with the following thoughts:

Another Day In Paradise, by Phil Collins.

Many people across the U.S. today are bracing themselves for a wintry storm. The grocery store parking lots and aisles are packed. The cars are lined up outside the schools for early dismissals. The gloves, earmuffs and heavy coats have been unearthed for this mid-January flurry of activity. But what if you and I were homeless? Don’t you feel helpless waiting at that red-light when a homeless woman or man stands at the corner with a cardboard sign? I do!

Read ahead to learn about an easy way you can help that person the next time this happens.

Did you know that over 16,000 people were reportedly homeless in GEORGIA in a study done in January, 2013?

No one has ever become poor by giving.” Helen Keller 

Click here to read the 2015 report on homelessness in Georgia.

The unifying condition for virtually all of Georgia’s homeless population is poverty. Many people who are homeless also experience some type of personal vulnerability that places them at risk, such as:

  • Family violence
  • Physical disability or chronic medical problems
  • Mental illness
  • Substance abuse
  • Development disability or brain injury
  • Criminal background

Leah and I are planning to have a care kit party soon! If you have some unexpected, spare hours that pop up in the weekend ahead with this winter weather, perhaps you’d like to plan one with your kids, grandchildren, or friends, too!

If you cannot feed one hundred people, then just feed one.” Mother Teresa

 You can use Evite to invite your friends and delegate out items for each of them to bring. By the end of your party, you will all have a few care kits to keep in your car for the next time you see that homeless person on the corner at a red light. It is a very cool way to impact the homeless in our communities and have fun while doing it!

The following information was obtained by The Portland Rescue Mission website.

How To Pack A Care Kit

Care Kits are a simple way to provide practical help to a homeless man or woman. Keep some in your car so you’re prepared to offer to a person in need.

Items to Include:
A typical Care Kit consists of a watertight gallon-size zipper lock plastic bag filled with items like:

Water bottle
Socks
Tuna and crackers
Granola Bar or cereal bar
Fruit snack or applesauce cup
Crackers with peanut butter or cheese
Gift certificate to fast food
Hand wipes
Pack of Kleenex
Maxi pads
Toothbrush and toothpaste
Nail clippers
Band Aids
Chapstick
Comb or small brush
Mints, cough drops or gum
Rescue Mission meal voucher
Note of encouragement or uplifting Bible verse or young children can color a picture as you teach them about those in need. You may want to also include some information about homeless shelters in your area.

NOTE:
Fragranced items such as soap, hand lotion or deodorant can negatively affect the taste of food items if placed in the same bag. Pack these separately if you choose to give them.
Avoid items such as mouthwash or hand sanitizer that contain alcohol. 

There will always be poor among us.” Matthew 26:11

Have a Care Kit party! Gather family, friends, co-workers or your community group to purchase supplies and assemble Care Kits together.
Care Kits are useful both in warm and cold weather. In summer, include sunblock or frozen water bottles. In winter, include gloves, hats or heatpacks.

When you give your Care Kits away…

*Don’t be in a hurry. It’s okay to slip it out your window to someone on a street corner or freeway ramp. But consider taking time to park the car and hand-deliver it.
*Smile. This person probably gets ignored by hundreds of people every day.
*Make eye contact. It shows that the person matters.
*Don’t give money. It’s your decision, of course, but we generally discourage giving cash. Instead, ask what their immediate need is and consider how you can help. Buy them a meal? A bus ticket?
*Be available to have a conversation. Some people won’t want to talk, so be sensitive. Others will be delighted to tell you their story.
*Pray. Before you go, while you go, for the people you encounter. Ask the person if they would like you to pray for them right there.
*Offer resources. Ask if the person knows about local homeless shelters in the area. 
*Be wise. The majority of homeless men and women are not dangerous — they’re people just like you. But it’s smart to go out as a group when handing out Care Kits.
*Inspire others. Tell others about your project and inspire them to do the same.

It was good to see in the past week where two churches in our Cobb county community joined forces to aid the homeless in Atlanta, especially as the weather turned bitter cold. There will always be needs in our world and we may not be able to solve all the world problems, but we can encourage one soul with a care kit! Always make your personal safety a priority when helping those in need. And remember to involve the young people who are in your life. Our actions can speak louder than our words, especially for the youth who are watching us as we live out our days. Oh, and click here for one of my favorite stories from 2015 about my homeless friend, Pamela.

Previous Posts You May Have Missed:

Eight Ways To Share With Others

My Own Little World

Joy Comes In The Morning

Open hands begging

2 thoughts on “Have A Care Kit Party”

  1. Too many times I’m finding myself rushing past the homeless, brushing off the “hey man – can you help me out”, and frankly ignoring those in need.

    Wow. I can’t believe I just admitted that. But this weekend in particular -I was visiting all the beautiful squares in downtown Savannah, enjoying the weather and my morning walk. As I was cutting through one of the squares I noticed what appeared to be a couple of homeless men. One of the men yelled out to me – hey man – almost in a friendly fashion. I obliged and said hello. Then came the hey babe you help me out. I brushed him off and not today man. But wha really struck me was the abrasive moment that was said out loud as I continued my walk through the square. It was said just loud enough so I could hear it. I wanted to go back and pick a fight. A few choice words crossed my mind of what I would say back.

    Instead, I was diplomatic and just kept walking away. What bothers me most is that I wanted to be aggressive back.

    It still bothers me – even a Poole of days later.. But what I take away from this post is to pray, be kind to others, and most of the time the homeless just want to be loved just like the rest of us.

  2. HI there Sam! I just love when you are able to take the time to leave a comment, so thanks! I would’ve wanted to lash out in those same circumstances. When we are considering helping those in need, we are under NO obligation to do so, and should only help when our heart is telling us to. I believe we probably should do so only when it is safe, when we are being led, and (obviously) when we have the ready resources. There is NO reason for unkindness in my mind, not by us who have all of our needs being met, and not by those who aren’t presently having their needs met. Sometimes a friendly smile and a pleasant word can be a game-changer for someone’s day. I am so happy you were able to visit Savannah…Just Love those squares that seem to go on and on! Thanks, again, Sam!

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